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alltheworldsachoolinbox.JPG isn't it now possible for every world record job creator to carry a rachel and distribute their jobs learning updates to every hub of rachel alumni

shouldnt parents and children have choice to be linkedin to job creating teachers -what else is www and mobile for?

Saturday, January 21, 2017

Ris for Rachel; L for LearningEconomy : Abed & Adolescent Girls Livelihood Hubs; C is China G20 for ever; H is for Health & Happiness as twin missions of world class internet brands; E is for EWTP and Ema and smE

rachel.jpg 

12:07 pm est 

Thursday, January 19, 2017

l is for learning Economy - the 21st C learning economy is 10 times bigger to sustain than the industrail revolution thing/consumption /extration economy

 

the risks of industrial revolution 4 getting tere in time before lack of colaboration destrys huamn sustainability need matyre mapping - meanwhile em;power every ytouth to co-craete small entrepruses; open space ; local shark-tanl[ replicate 30000 open sourec apps and microfranchsioes- how do we design every school to hub that

 

MY SCHOOL
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MY ECONOMICS

WELCOME TO WORLDYOUTHCOMMUNITY

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Celebrating first 10 years of Valuing Global Youth

Help us catalogue markets and purposes that youth value most chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Foundation Norman Macrae - The Economist's Pro-youth economist and since 1972 Entrepreneurial Revolution's founder of open education Washington DC 1 301 881 1655

LATEST ACTIVITY

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chris macrae posted discussions
yesterday
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion G20 student union club
"Extract from digital economy initiative announced at China G20 V. Way Forward: Actions to Make a Difference Recognizing that the digital shifts underway are reshaping economies and societies today and will continue to do so in the future, the G20…"
Monday
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion G20 student union club
"4 september 2016 - jinping opening address Ladies and Gentlemen, Dear Friends, Good afternoon! I am so glad to have all of you with us here in Hangzhou. The G20 Summit will begin tomorrow, an event much anticipated by the international community as…"
Monday
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion G20 student union club
"Xi JInping is due to make some major speeches in swizeralnd around te wprld economic forum - context Xinhua Insight: Xi's world vision: a community of common destiny, a shared home for…"
Monday
chris macrae posted a discussion

101 greatest job creators youth can value most

A 25 around jinping and kissinger including c100:: B 25 around jack ma and coding/leasrning geneartion wizardsC 25 around g20 sustainability solutions networks and with china connectionsD 25 others but who could gain from connecting with chinaresources AC http://smbaworld.com/id202.htmlresourecs B CECresources mainly B blockchainresources worldrecosr jobs creators http://rowp.tvAA1…See More
Sunday
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion BrandChartering.com - the book that stated a valuation and media revolution
"@ The Economist 1972, Norman Macrae started curriculum of Entrepreneurial Revolution to search for net generation’s 3 billion new jobs. Billion renewing planet Billion networking microfranchises and education solutions so every community…"
Sunday
chris macrae posted a discussion
Jan 8
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion BrandChartering.com - the book that stated a valuation genere
"Masterbriefing - 1 of 12 ways to make media more economical ... 查看此网页的中文翻译,请点击 翻译此页 Masterbriefing - 1 of 12 ways to make media more economical for 99% of peoplesPosted by chris macrae on October 16, 2013 at 4:50am View…"
Jan 6
chris macrae posted discussions
Jan 6
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion ER Year 45 - Without a livelihood office in every school usa could become worst big nation for leasrning a living
"what is a livelihood office how do you know if yoiur school (middle, high, graduate) has a livelihoods office? look for the opposite of a careers office which says if you get a series of college certificates then you will secure a career in xxx…"
Jan 5
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion curriculum of (ending) poverty
Jan 2
chris macrae replied to chris macrae's discussion curriculum of (ending) poverty
Jan 2
chris macrae's discussion was featured

curriculum of (ending) poverty

INTRODUCTION Norman Macrae web project with alumnisat.com , amychina.net andglobalgrameenIn 1984 The Economist's Deputy Editor (and special "entrepreneurial" correspondent for intergenerational sustainability) wrote: early in the 21st C as networks make every place's livelihoods more interconnected than separated sustainability of the…See More
Jan 2
chris macrae posted a discussion

curriculum of (ending) poverty

INTRODUCTION Norman Macrae web project with alumnisat.com , amychina.net andglobalgrameenIn 1984 The Economist's Deputy Editor (and special "entrepreneurial" correspondent for intergenerational sustainability) wrote: early in the 21st C as networks make every place's livelihoods more interconnected than separated sustainability of the…See More
Jan 2
chris macrae's video was featured

cubaworldfirst

amy -en route to world children celebration DC june 2015 - searches out wonderful news from cuba - first nation to end transmission of hiv from mother to babe
Jan 1
chris macrae posted a video

cubaworldfirst

amy searches out wonderful news from cuba - first nation to end transmission of hiv from mother to babe
Jan 1
More...
 

 

9:43 am est 

valuetrue.com - Chapter 2 Pro-youth banking for livelihoods

Keynsians and The Economist's 12 year futures dialogue of Entrepreneurial Revolution concluded in 1984 : to sustain the net generation at least 30000 microfranchises would need to be searched out and banked. 

 1972's Next 40 Years ; 1976's Coming Entrepreneurial Revolution; 12 week leaders debate 1982's We're All Intrapreneurial Now What will human race produce in 20th C Q4? - Jan 1975

Timing-wise humanity would need hi-trust as well as hi-tech support for this most valuable search. Will public servants and public mass media help as soon as digital media became massively accessible.

A microfranchise defines a service skillset (team-based or individually) which is valued in a local community so that positive cashflow is sustained, but so that all or most of the surplus stays with the workers and in the local community. Common sense suggests this is the most general of open source innovation. However unlike a code or language, whose commons purpose is communal first and individually invented second, the entrepreneurial question arises: is the purpose of the main inventors and investors of a microfranchise so social that they will never want to tax local livelihoods by maximally extracting from them every audit period. Conversely unlike a profit-extracting service franchise which deserves to be charged whatever media and superstars costs, a microfranchise merits freedom of speech via 21stC accessibilility linked in by mobile networking and the joy of www

The 64 trillion dollar question of financial services innovation becomes - how can pro-youth banking for livelihoods be innovated? Mathematically we recommend a mapping analogy. Navigating the new world opened up in the 1490s by Amerigo Vespucci and Christopher Columbus depended on collaboration transparency of mapmaking. Probably 10 times more of that depth of local infrastructural trust will be needed by and for millennials led by women4empowerment so as to invest in going way beyond the 20th C affliction of zero sum maps of finance to the wonderful trust flows of whole truth compasses of goodwill multiplication that social business models can lead to and be celebrated around.

 

Extraordinary Inter-generation Impacts of  Banking for Jobs World Record Cases

There are at least 5 systems cases of pro-youth banking for jobs at the general level of inventing and being trusted to sustain investments in microfranchises -and most have been tested by poorest mothers whose purpose was to improve their childrens possibilities way beyond the poverty line. The first two come from Bangladesh's pre-digital development; the next three come from mobile partnerships with the poorest led by womens networks (Bangladesh-Kenya has proven to be a particularly innovative twinning though open youth technologists are advised to celebrate 4 hemisphere quartets of capital celebrations at the speed of the web)

  • Skills based banking for Jobs -microfranchising whole value chain to be owned in trust for poorest
  • Circles based banking and its deepest impacts on empowering poor to regenerate community
  • Being first to digitalise record keeping of banking so that new economy invests in poorest youth- eg kenya happy family banking model for slum-dwellers
  • Cashless banking except for last mile eg Kenya Mpesa
  • Points banking in anything of exchange value- the most simple in age of net generation being mobile connectivity time

 

Banks for Youth Jobs

has your nation's currency become paper politicians print so youth have to bail out older's errors and bank's gambling -

why not  design other pro-youth exchanges  

Keynsian View From 1972

Keynes general theory comes to a surprising conclusion. The chief threat to the sustainability of youth (and so the human race) is a segment of elders' economists. Because the world of place markets (currently called nations) is increasingly ruled only by economists and a place's mediation of public servants, if or wherever economic theory dictates systems that do not empower youth to continuously work on overarching goal to end poverty, sustainability of that place will be lost. It is only a minor extrapolation to see that as trust-flow dynamics of a borderless world accelerate, if economists spin numbers causing a nation state to fail its youth, then big brother chain reactions of destruction are stochastically likely. The worldwide corollary is that peace and health society generate strong economies not vice versa.

POP View Mid 2010s

In view of Keynsian logics, it shouldn't be a surprise that those whose leadership values serve Preferential Option Poorest are able to linkin to designing pro-youth banking which sustains next generation's livelihoods

 

Productivity-wise, both the Keynsian and the POP facilitator value ending systemic poverty chains as the most exciting goal to unite the human race and next generation's livelihoods around.

9:35 am est 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

what if we helped youth free the peoples small enegtreprise hubs generate the open tech hubs replace siloised universities
dear lee - wonderful note - 

is it possible for you to make a one minute video and send me/us the source code (next time amy could do a one minute interview with you but this time can you fly your message solo)

what would you say to teenagers and educators where 3-d print trainers and fab lab experts are coaching them about the opportunity to open source creativity (products) with your invention- could the first outlet selling their produce be on tao bao

the reason i have cc'd the following people all of whom amy knows are :

al's community is the genuine future history of the peoples america;; it is to usa what gandhi's and montessoris ashrams are to india- al also runs a cybercentre hub (and whole schooling system) out of west baltimore- pope francis and others are watching its progress- 3 d printing is one of the subjects taught- 30 years before gandhi's whole truth moment in s africa being thrown off a 1st class carriage of a train- 4 young black ladies from al's parish were thrown off a baltimore cruise liner- they won their compensation case establishing in american case law establishing the rule that african americans are people not belongings- al's community went on to generate the likes of thurgood marshall and so systemically all sustainable civil rights movements- so al's open spaces across baltimore are the real thing in terms of black american youth building usa in ways that even obama south chicago never system-deep transformation could ever be; its important to be confident about this in inviting everyone on the hill to come and tour west baltimore- put impolitely west baltimore is the moral epicente without which the whole of dc-baltimore as capital benchmark of usa will collapse

3 jayfus is one of al's top advisers on what wizard tech training could be possible - his juice and juxtopia networks train black american youth in coding and place them in influential jobs as well as asking them to give back in competing for xlearning prizes- he can organise the number 1 blockchain training in the region of the sort that jack ma would be proud of valuing small enterprises as well as the most radical coders of sustainable youth 

0 RACHEL : i have given al a magic gizmo from intel world possible- basically if we have a one minute video of yours this becomes viewable on a local hotspot by up to 50 people in the room at same time so the community can gossib that all across town and the regional supercity. and what is hot on one rachel hot box intel wil distribute to thousands of rachels as well as their web of true open source  jobs training  - so we are trying to connect such video invitations with a livelihoods offices across al's whole schooling systems and partnerships

4 chris king visits al at least twice a week and has been an uber connector for amy and many of us with conscious capitalism networks which go way beyond the vision john mackey has yet managed to celebrate pout of any of his whole food outlets

5 stefanos shuttles between dc and addis abba building youth tech hubs -incidentally the world bank has published map of over 100 african hubs- http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/765531472059967675/AFC42460-081716.pdf

the question as always is why dont world bank experts share knowhow they mediate across african hubs with african american hubs in our own regional supercity- basically steve case who made his money at aol is going to get to the stage of asking the world bank and all elite university experts in dc that question but i would rather people around al did first as thats the route to partnetring jack ma and AliBabaUNi  - that way al's hubs could not only ensure goodiwll between yoiuth of usa and china the way kissinger EVENT: Henry A. Kissinger Keynotes Committee of 100 Event "U.S.-China Relations in the Trump-Xi Era" in New York | December 14, 2016 - Committee of 100 has requested  but also negotiate as equals with 1776 hubs (which steve has put many millions into)

 

 


6 jose up in new york links togerher major fab labs between mit and rest of the world

7 dr tranga uses the intel device to help curate open learning content for 300000 kenyan catholic rural children- dr ramhga will spend mot of 2017 in bangalore linking coders nilekani and past president kalam used to introduce him to - 2019 sees the 3 year SD-goals collaboration journey from china g20 to india g20 complete the youth action networking takeover of the un (at least as far as advancing sustainability goals and jobs is concerned- why would anyone want the un in new york not to be replaced by a year round g20 roadshow connected by energetic youth like amy and open spaced everywhere that job creating educators of the greatest #learinggeneration can linkin)

8 once we put the good news videos on to this portable hot box, well when qin and i shows the existence of this box to china's biggest education summit the curiosity provoked in china was amazing

2 camilo and i chat in new york which is also the epicentre of this hotpost research buy intel and the future of greatest learning generation summits that miko attended at un- camilo team run wall street fudnes to end ;poverty and camilo is a professor in the engineering school of columbia university

9 one of john kiehls friends gave nyu engineering school 100 milion dollars - nyu has a partnership with a leading engineering school in shanghai

10 maurice is the "amy" of youth around the vatican trying to underdtand how to link in francsican and tao cultures- this years facilitation needs to be meeting between jinping and ;pope francis; 2018 everybody of goodwill needs to land on argentina's g20

11 ian is a main adsiser of amy in london; he is also a main adviser to cranfield the number 2 engineering school in uk- his friends include teh number 1 female marketer in the city pof london who has just been headhunted by the princes trust and before charles did that she was just about to work with the reality tv mega producer on the UN's project everyone 

12 tebabu has worked with maryland legislature as first state to legimamise bcorps; he's also one of the few african american people connecting both inner city afriocan american and african youth regereation - he knows the ethiopian who manages the union of several hundred thoudsand coffee farmers in ethiopia- tebabu would like to end middlemen from marketing blessed coffee - that way the farmers could getb more than 1% of cooffee's total market cvalue and the community cafes that buy direct could get mlore to reinvest in cafes being the simplest peoples hubs for hostking 8 one hour open spaces a day The Collaboration Cafe

 

 


oops stop before i get to 13 or ask me for more who's who ---i am sorry - for some this may be too many detail's - for me these dots once connected can link win-wins between all of you and of course in a way amy always is youths dot connector in chief- in china there is only one amy but there are also half a million amy's- with no elders social safety net the whole country depends on youths livelihoods- for that reason it has zero interest in education systems that are disconnected for jobs -it is about to pull the plug on any university leader who believes the goal of colleges is to get ever richer and further removed from job creation-

 if that means 90% of american universities also go bankrupt and get taken back by youth 
- jolly good show- oops i assume the one good thing about living in trump america is that i cant be as politically incorrect as he is- its not the majority of people in universities i am attacking its their adminstrators blind investment in bricks not how sustainability youth need to click now if there is to be any happiness and freedom left 

any reporting errors mine alone

 

 

 

 


From: lee wainwright <hleewainwright@m>
To: christopher macrae <chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk> 
Sent: Tuesday, 17 January 2017, 12:58
Subject: Re: helping XI and Francis - maurice amy mostofa -when will you 3 meet again in thunder lighting or in rain - her's how china rome and bangladesh youth need to value world record joib creators

Hi Chris

I just sent this to you to thank you for introducing Amy to us.  She is a delightful, intelligent, and compassionate individual and we enjoyed her stay with us.  She is welcome back anytime.  You made a good choice hiring her for your mission.

I don't have anything to really catapult your mission into orbit, but as a side note, I am developing a technology for young people of all ages to embrace on the entrepreneurial front lines that will allow them to control attributes of any surface of any product (Apparel fabrics, flexible materials, semi-solids, and solids).  I submitted a patent application and I'm 99% certain I'll get all the claims since people aren't looking to remove electronics from products that are required to respond to smart phones, light up, display alphanumeric data like bio-physical health monitoring, etc., but I am doing exactly that!  Products and Apparel will have the ability to do all of those things without any batteries, wires, LEDs, conductive surfaces, or any electronics attached.

I will open source the programming data for free to encourage youth to explore the possibilities.  Amy saw a little demo of it on my robot pillow toy, but that just scratches the surface of potential uses.  My goal is to notify software developers everywhere to start writing code to create their own remote controlled surfaces so it boosts the sales of "The Opti-Coupler" device.  Similar in shape and size of the first I-Phone, preparing kids to use it is a simple process and I would love the opportunity to do that someday everywhere in the world.

Dalia, a designer for Hollywood celebs and designer of dresses for contestants on "Dancing with the Stars", intends to take this tech to the market in her "smart purse".  (see attached, but it does so much more).   

Dawan Scott, a friend of ours (He played the role as Big Foot in Harry and the Henderson's movie and TV series, acted in Harry Potter, and was an NBA player), is working as a coach in a prestigious Hollywood private school for children of the 1%. He's working to acquire investors to help me kick off the tech and also wants to use it himself for promoting his school, his "Green Company" mission to save the world's endangered species, to promote the NBA, and to license it out to promotional companies.  I'll keep you informed of my progress as things congeal a bit more...

Check out my new website. It should be finished next week.  Last thing I need to add is the list of speaking engagements I've had around the world over the past 20 years..  I make no mention of the new tech "Opti-Coupler" since it needs to be a bit secretive until later this year when it's released.

H. Lee Wainwright 
8:36 am est 

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

dear camilo

i met maurice on my 2nd trip to rome 2015 -while an internal auditor by profession he is youth volunteer at vatican university for their annual summit www.premiosciacca.it  celebrating worldwide community builders which connects high up in the cardinal hierarchy- he's also met kiehl dianne amy emiko and i when he was in new york this time last year - rome also intersects club of rome green and nobel peace summits, youth cultures to be celebrated at a new underground colliseum, and un food ie goal 2 practice networks

in parallel to my chinese and bangladesh youth friends maurice has been trying to develop networks where youth lead the decision-making and have a stake in sustaining the investment or the jobs creation

I am asking him at the moment to find out anything he can about pope francis meeting china's leader xi jiinping (cheng li at brookings has just brought out a 5 year diary of jinpings main action goals now that he chooses his own 7 person eladership team for the next 5 yeras and this is constantly updated by kissinger and 100 chiense americas he first help network togetrher in 1989) and to see how student union clubs can link back to g20 events in argentina 2018- jinping like recent party leaders gained know has a province leader- fortunately it was the one that jack ma also builds hos ost trusted nusienss leaders networks around



dear maurice - camilo and his friend rodrigo run boutique wall street funds designed to help end poverty in latin america especially mexico at the moment- camilo's maths is also creating a leading womens business fund- he's also a professor in the engineering department of columbia univeristy in new york

i dont know latin america well enough to know who are the leadership heroes although i do have top level contacts at the organsiation of american states - where i have found that the iadb and blum at berkeley are doing very important work - 
if i am correct china wants to unite every sustainability movement franciscan it can over the next 2 years as does jim kim at the world bank

so if it is practical i need the two of you to continuously share intelligence at a level i cant keep up with
at the same time we are building an inner city black hub in west baltimore led by al hathaway who has visited the pope and has common community health friends to jim kim and he is linked to baltimores leading trainers in coding including blockchain 
========================

its my view that the chinese are using the g20 with their launch out of jack ma's hangzhou consensus 2016 to invite the most exciting collaborations around sustainability goals- action networks not the un's elders chat spaces

partly this view come from jack ma's central involvement -arguably he is tte greatest end poverty coder with blockchains and job creator designing ecommerce channels around small enterprises - i try to track his progress at AliBabaUNi 
additionally elders in china have no social safety net other than their often 1 child - so they are desperate that youth are fully employed- what this means is if you go to a global education summit in beijing the mass media is asking all the most relevant questions the opposite of the west

china also need climate projects as anyone who notes winter weather paters around beijing can see

then china is building world trade routes by supertrain and superports all across west of china through north india/pakistan/middle east russia down to venice and across to africa - the old marco polo silk route which jack ma's hangzhou was epicentred of in 1200s

if the tao values of 1+billion chinese and the franciscans values of 1 billion latin people can be connected educationally in real sustainability and job creation value chains that will be good

i will try and improve how to click through world record job creator research youth are helping me with at VALUETRUE.com POP maps of on-demand curricula with the world record book of job creation 

4:44 pm est 

Friday, February 20, 2015

Hacking the World Bank Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “Hacking the World Bank

[MUSIC: The Diplomats of Solid Sound, “Soul Slaw” (from Instrumental, Action, Soul)]

Stephen J. DUBNER: Back in 2012, Jim Yong Kim was minding his own business, carrying out his duties as president of Dartmouth College. He was in his third year there. Then his phone rang. And he learned that the President of the United States wanted to hire him away.

Jim Yong KIM: Quite literally on a Monday, a Dartmouth graduate from 1983, Tim Geithner, called me and said, “Jim, would you consider being president of the World Bank?” And you know, this is the work that I devoted my entire life to, you know, development and fighting poverty. And so, you know, I called the chair of my board right away and I said, “You know, the president is asking me to consider this, I have to do it.” And so that was a Monday. I flew down and met with President Obama on a Wednesday…

DUBNER: Did you know him previously?

KIM: I had met him once before. But my first sit-down meeting with him was in the Oval Office to talk about this particular job. And then on that Friday we were in the Rose Garden, and he was announcing me as the U.S. candidate.

PRESIDENT OBAMA: When a nation goes from poverty to prosperity, it makes the world stronger and more secure for everybody.That’s why the leader of the World Bank should have a deep understanding of both the role that development plays in the world, and the importance of creating conditions where assistance is no longer needed. I believe that nobody is more qualified to carry out that mission than Dr. Jim Kim.

KIM: I still had to campaign. I had to compete for the job. But it all happened in the course of one week. So it was really quite a, quite a whirlwind.

DUBNER: Now, most previous World Bank presidents were either former bankers, lawyers, or government officials. You meanwhile are a physician, anthropology Ph.D., college president, spent most of your life in academia, non-profits, not even…I say not even an academic economist as though that were a higher credential, which I don’t mean to imply. But what does it say about the World Bank or President Obama or you or the shape of the world, and especially the shape of development and new ideas in development, that a guy like you wound up in a place like this?

KIM: Well, I remain extremely grateful to President Obama. Now, let me tell you how that conversation went. He put it right on the table as he always does. He said, “Look, Jim, what am I gonna tell the people around me who tell me that this is, that I should appoint a macroeconomist? You know, what justification can I give them for nominating you?” And so I started right off by saying, “Well, President Obama, have you read your mother’s dissertation?” And he sat back and he looked at me and said, “Well, yeah, I have.” And I said, “Well, you’ll remember that your mother argued that the entire world thought that the artisanal industry in Indonesia would be wiped out, especially metal workers, would be wiped out by globalization. But what she should showed was that in fact that industry thrived, globalization actually gave a boost to that industry.” And I said, “You know, that’s what I do, I’ve been doing development on the ground for the last 25 years. And so while I’m not a macroeconomist, I do take a look at things like how incentives work and the reality of development efforts on the ground. And so I will always bring that perspective.” And he looked at me and he said, “Okay, I get that.” Later in a more relaxed moment with President Obama, he said, “You know, Jim, I have to say, that’s one of the best ploys I’ve ever seen, you know, reading the President’s mother’s thesis is a good strategy.” And we had a good laugh about it.

DUBNER: Yeah, you know, as you were telling the story, I was thinking, I know this is meant to illustrate the strengths of economic thinking vis-a-vis development, but really I’m thinking most people out there when they hear this are going to take it more as an interview tip, certainly. That whenever possible, if the boss has a mother who wrote some kind of dissertation, you know, prepare. That’s the…

KIM: Prepare, and especially if it’s relevant, which it very much was.

DUBNER: You kind of lucked out on that. You have to admit. That it was relevant…

KIM: I have to.

DUBNER: It was very relevant (laughs).

[THEME]

ANNOUNCER: From WNYC: This is FREAKONOMICS RADIO, the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything. Here’s your host, Stephen Dubner.

[MUSIC: The Juice To Make It Happen “Horny Toad”]

DUBNER: Okay, so here is the best part of the story. It wasn’t just that Jim Yong Kim knew that President Obama’s mother had written a dissertation that was related to his  development work — and then went and got it in order to prepare for his meeting with the President. Uh-uh. That’s not the way it happened.

KIM: Well, I was so fascinated by President Obama dating back to 2004 that I actually bought her unpublished thesis from the University of Michigan archives and faithfully read the whole thing long before I actually went in to that interview with President Obama.

DUBNER: But let me say this: the more you hear from Kim, the less surprised you are by anything he’s accomplished. And now he is taking the World Bank in a very different direction, which we’ll hear about. But first, let’s begin at the beginning…

KIM: My name is Jim Yong Kim. I’m the president of the World Bank Group. And our organization last year lent and provided grants of about $65 billion. And our mission is to end extreme poverty in the world and to boost what we call shared prosperity, which is a notion that focuses on ensuring that the bottom 40 percent of any developing country shares in whatever economic growth there is.

DUBNER: So World Bank is fairly impressive. I understand that your childhood dream as an immigrant kid in Iowa where your father was a dentistry professor, that your dream was to be quarterback for the Minnesota Vikings or the Chicago Bears, so I’m sorry that that didn’t work out. Are you okay with where you wound up?

KIM: Well given the way that the Chicago Bears certainly have been doing, I’m very happy with the way it worked out. But, you know, that was, in the middle of Iowa, boy, the greatest thing that you could ever become is a professional athlete for one of those teams. And so I was fully part of that culture. And I actually played quarterback for my high school football team. And, although some people are impressed with that, I then also have to admit that our high school football team had the longest losing streak in the nation when I was the quarterback.

DUBNER: Okay, so that’s still a record of some sort that you’re attached to.

KIM: It’s a record. It sure is.

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Jim was also the chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has earned a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship. And for the last three years, he has served as the president of Dartmouth College. I should also mention that after immigrating to this country from Korea at age five, Jim went on to become the president of his high school class, the quarterback of the football team, the point guard of the basketball team. I just found out he is a five handicap in golf. I’m a little resentful about that last item. (Laughter.) But he does it all.

DUBNER: Becoming an M.D. and then an anthropologist, was not Kim’s original plan.

KIM: Well let me tell you the story, Stephen. You know, I, my mother is a philosopher. She’s still alive, still working on her writing and very involved in her work on East Asian philosophy. And my father was a dentist. You know dentists are extremely practical people. So I had these two influences in my life. And you know, one day I came home from school, and this was at Brown, one of my first semesters at Brown, and my father picked me up from the airport, which is about 30 miles from our hometown in Iowa. And he said, “So, Jim, what do you want to study?” And I said, “Well, I think I’d like to study politics and philosophy, and I think I’d like to become a politician.” And so he slowly pulled the car over to the side of the road, looked back at me and he said, “Look, Jim, when you finish your internship and residency, you can do anything you want.” So I have had this very practical father who said, “Look, you know, you’re an Asian in this country, no one’s going to give you anything. And if you think you’re going to make it as a politician you better think again. You can do that, but first and foremost get a skill where you actually can help people.”

DUBNER: Now, let’s go back when you were in nonprofits, or NGOs, or whatever form they were in, where you were trying to bring healthcare and bring, you know, deliver all different kinds of necessary and often very primary health care to especially poor places around the world. You were not a fan of the World Bank. You were active, I’ve read in the “50 Years is Enough” movement, the campaign to shut the bank as well as the I.M.F., contending that they did more harm than good. That’s the report at least that I’ve read. Tell me A) if that report is true, how true it is, and what led to your evolution in thinking about an institution like the World Bank?

KIM: Well it’s, it’s true, and there’s actually good evidence that it was true. I was one of the editors on a book that’s entitled “Dying for Growth: Global Inequality and the Health of the Poor.” And it basically was a critique of the approach that many of the international financial institutions had taken to health. And at the time, what we were arguing was that an overly narrow focus on growth of GDP was really not the approach that we thought would lead to the kind of results that everyone seemed to want to have. In other words, there were arguments that you should restrict social spending, including on health and education. And so what we were arguing is that we should focus on more than just GDP growth and we should really try to take a much more nuanced view of what are the factors that are important in lifting people out of poverty. And that’s really the direction that the World Bank has gone in a major way in the last 20 years. And so I’m very glad we lost the “50 Years Is Enough” argument because the institution is very different now than it was before. And I think that’s what made it possible for me to lead the institution. The ideas have changed, and partly, and this is what you guys have done so beautifully in both Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, is you’ve actually made hypotheses, but then you’ve looked at the data. So the data now are overwhelming in that investments in health and education, for example, are critical aspects of a growth strategy. You know, Larry Summers published a paper just a year ago showing that in low- and middle-income countries, fully 25 percent of the economic growth experienced between 2000 and 2011 was due to better health outcomes. So we don’t at this institution and we have not for a long time thought about health and education as simply expenditures. We now think of them as fundamental investments in human capital that will lead to growth. And so the institution itself, and this is what’s great about the World Bank Group, the institution itself has really looked at the data, really looked at the evidence carefully, and we’ve  shifted a great deal.

DUBNER: Okay, so the World Bank recently released a World Development Report titled “Mind, Society, and Behavior,” which I have to admit does not sound right off the bat like a World Bank report form the past, for sure. And it argues for really a new viewpoint or new mindset for attacking poverty. So if you could begin, Dr. Kim, just tell me the background. Were you behind this, who was behind it, and what was the impetus?

KIM: Well it was…It came out of a pretty straightforward discussion that Kaushik Basu, our chief economist, himself originally from India, but a celebrated professor of economics, development economics at Cornell for many years. And he and I were just sitting down one day and we started talking about behavioral economics. And we started about some of the work that I had become fascinated with when I was at Dartmouth about things like willpower and grit and how they had an impact on success in life and development. And so, you know, he suggested one day that we, that we just take this on. And so that’s how it, how it came to pass. It was a recognition that we really needed a rethink of where we were going with development strategy. And we also wanted to bring into the discourse of the World Bank Group these thinkers who’ve been so influential in academia but had been much less influential inside the World Bank.

DUBNER: Interesting, yeah. As I read the report, it struck me as basically kind of a best-practices white paper that distills really much of the field if not the entire field of behavioral economics and highlights the sort of cognitive biases and illusions–and the antidotes to those problems–that a lot of people have been thinking and talking and writing about for many years, as you’ve said, primarily within academia, but not exclusively. And one point the report makes is that a lot of these insights are in retrospect pretty obvious, things like framing and anchoring and social norms, which other people call peer pressure. And it struck me that, you know, Adam Smith, who we commonly think of as the father of classical economics, was probably a lot more in tune with that human side of the human being than most economists of the mid and late 20th century. So I’m curious how you think that economics, again, granted not your field but you certainly know plenty about it, how do you think economics got so far away from considering a human being what to be what a human being really is? And why has it taken so long and so much effort to get back to this new old view?

KIM: Well, it’s a great question, you know. I, as an anthropologist, actually, in grad school we did read Adam Smith, and most of us were very surprised to hear him writing about moral sentiments and the profound moral voice that really is everywhere in his work and his writing. You know, there is a field of economic anthropology that’s been around for a long time. And I remember in one of my first early seminars in anthropology graduate school we took on the phenomenon of the potlatch. Now, in the Northwest Coast, Northwest Coast Indians would try to outduel each other in seeing how much of their most valuable possessions they could burn. That was the potlatch. And, of course, you know, from a rational perspective, why on earth would you burn your most valuable things? And, you know, Franz Boas, one of the early patriarchs of the field of anthropology went deeper and deeper into it and showed that in fact social status was so important to the Northwest Coast Indians that they were willing to do this and that the benefits from actually doing this were greater often than what they would burn. And so we had been trying to make sense of seemingly irrational behavior in anthropology for a very long time. And I think that the assumptions that economists make about rationality have actually led to the rapid development and growth of the field. I mean, economists have generally speaking, compared to other social sciences, been much more focused on quantification and sophisticated modeling. And I think you have to have a set of assumption in order to make a field that’s trying to do that grow. And so they started with that. You know, but we have to remember the Daniel Kahneman won his Nobel Prize on looking at different ways of thinking and questioning the assumptions that economists were making in 2002. And so his work predates that by quite a bit. And so we really took his notion that there’s these two kinds of thinking, fast thinking, slow thinking, and try to apply it to development work. And the fundamental messages are that one, people think automatically, that they think quickly, and they don’t think on the basis of ration and reason and, you know, looking through the evidence, that people think socially. In other words, other people who have the same thoughts influence them quite a bit. And they work on the basis of mental models that are often unconscious. And so, you know, we looked at those three kinds of thinking and tried to understand if there had been examples of people utilizing that insight to actually get better outcomes. And we found quite a few.

[MUSIC: Donvision; “Indian Summer”]

DUBNER: Coming up on Freakonomics Radio: we go through some of the most interesting, inspiring case studies in the World Bank’s new report:

KIM: But if you specifically said, “It’s very important for you to interact with your children in this way,” the mothers did it and it had this incredible impact 22 years later.

DUBNER: We talk about why it has taken public-sector entities so long to get on the behavioral bandwagon:

KIM: Public-sector entities can stay in business for a very long time no matter how poor their performance is.

DUBNER: And we put Dr. Kim through a lightning round of our FREAK-quently Asked Questions:

KIM: And I just desperately regret not having done more of that when I was younger.

[UNDERWRITING]

ANNOUNCER: From WNYC: This is FREAKONOMICS RADIO. Here’s your host, Stephen Dubner.

[MUSIC: Madrona Music, “Stay With Sly” (from Madrona Music Volume 1)]

DUBNER: We are talking today with Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank. He and Kaushik Basu, the Bank’s chief economist, commissioned a report that is meant to translate the best behavioral research from academia into real-world solutions to address poverty.

DUBNER: The most persuasive, to me, part of this World Bank report is a table listing examples of highly cost-effective behavioral interventions. So I’d like you to talk about a few of these with me. Your favorites, I guess, whether it’s addressing adherence to medical regimen, immunization rates, traffic accidents, aspirations and investment. They really run the whole scope of humankind. So underpinning the success of all of these to some degree through your view as a World Bank president is poverty, and that alleviating poverty would help all these things, which most people might not connect necessarily with poverty.

KIM: So again, this goes back to the brilliance of economists and how they have been focused on measuring, and how they’ve been focused on trying to get real evidence and real data. So one of my favorites is that in Jamaica they had an intervention with stunted children. In other words, these are children who had low weight and height for age. And, at a certain point stunting means that your brain literally has not been developing as it should. And it’s really hard to get that back. It’s hard to…

DUBNER: Hard to catch up, yeah.

KIM: It’s hard to catch up. So there was a very simple intervention where they had young students go and meet with mothers of stunted children. And they tried all kinds of different interventions, you know, income supplements, but one of the interventions was to just have young people come and stress the importance of having mothers in very poor settings who had other stunted children, how important it was for them to interact with their children. Now this was done once a week for two years. And then 22 years later, they looked at these kids, and so, and they looked at all the different inputs, and the one input that had the biggest difference was that intervention where they went and told mothers to interact with their kids more. And that particular group of stunted children had incomes that were equal to the non-stunted children. And those that did not have that intervention had incomes that are 25 to 30 percent lower than the non-stunted children. So it’s just, it’s incredible how these kinds of interventions can have that kind of an impact.

DUBNER: Let me just make sure that I understand the mechanism here, it’s basically stimulating vocabulary and language and thinking is that the idea of what’s going on that moves things forward?

KIM: Right, in other words, these were not mothers who were deliberately neglecting their children. But over years they developed different practices. You wrap up the kids and put them on your back or whatever, and you don’t have that much interaction. But if you specifically said it’s very important for you to interact with your children in this way, the mothers did it, and it had this incredible impact 22 years later. And so this is a great lesson for us. We have to in every, now, culture be sure that we’re actually giving that kind of advice, that if there’s stunting that, first of all you of course try to improve their nutritional status, but this issue of interacting with children is also really critical. And by changing these mothers’ mental model, it had this impact that was measurable economically 22 year later. And there are others as well. Another one that I love is one that had an impact on, that affected people’s understanding socially of the importance of using less water. This was in Colombia in the late 90s. And they simply published in the newspaper how much water all the different people and companies and groups were using. And there was an overall decrease in water consumption that persisted. So, in other words, knowing that your neighbors are trying to save, or knowing that you’re not saving and they’re going to see it in the newspaper had a huge impact on people’s use of water. Similarly there were in trying to reduce the number of accidents on the road, in Kenya, they put messages on buses that said if you see someone driving recklessly, look out the window, scream and yell at them and tell them to stop doing it. And everywhere you are scream and yell at people who are driving recklessly. It reduced insurance claims by 50 percent, you know, just to have the social pressure build in that particular way. So we are going to use this in World Bank Group. We’re going to capture all of these great examples, and we’ve totally reorganized the bank to do just that. We now have what we call “Global Practices.” And their charge is to look all over the world and find out how specific countries have had success utilizing these insights that come from psychology. And so in doing that, we hope that they will then take these examples and then adapt them for the local context. As an anthropologist, of course, you can imagine I’m going to insist that we respect local contexts. But we feel that we can make tremendous progress if we capture these ideas and bring them to poor countries. But also, we’re looking internally, because our strong assumption is that automatic thinking, socially influenced thinking, and mental models affect the way we assess projects. So we actually did a study of our own staff. And we…

DUBNER: With the skin cream and the…

KIM: Yes! The skin cream and the minimum wage. And asked them to use the same set of data. Of course, we adapted it to talk about the skin cream. And we had them assess whether skin cream A or B is better for skin rashes. And then using exactly the same data, but in a different context, we asked them to assess whether the minimum wage increased or decreased poverty rates. And they did much better in getting the right answer, because based on the data there was clearly a right answer for both of these questions; they did much better with the skin cream than they did with minimum wage, because of course our staff came in with preconceived notions and mental models about the importance of minimum wages. So what we’re going to do specifically inside the Bank is try to figure out ways where we can get them to do what Daniel Kahneman called “slow thinking.” You know, can we get them to be more deliberative, to be more focused on the mechanics of a particular project or particular intervention, to really consider data first before they jump to a conclusion? Can we keep leaders like me to keep their mouths shut, for example, to not influence socially where a group ends up landing on a particular decision?

DUBNER: The report notes that the private sector has already adopted a lot of these behavioral approaches because, and I’ll quote, “When failure affects the profit making bottom line, product designers begin to pay close attention to how humans actually think and decide.” So, Dr. Kim, why has it taken nonprofits, including the development sector certainly, so long to buy in? Do you think that it’s simply the absence of the market and the needs that exist within the market? Is it the downplaying of ROI within the nonprofit sector? Is it a philosophical point?

KIM: Well, I think market forces are critical here. And sometimes people say, “Well, you know, the private sector does everything better.” And I don’t know that that’s really the case so much as that the private sector entities that did it poorly no longer exist, right, because they go out of business. And public-sector entities can stay in business for a very long time no matter how poor their performance is. And so this is part of what I’ve been obsessed with for about the past 20 years. I’ve been, I’ve been trying to understand in the absence of market forces, how can you improve execution, how can you raise the temperature so that people really focus on improving execution? Because in the public sector, you know, not only do we tolerate poor execution, but often, unfortunately, we celebrate poor execution. You know, poor execution sometimes for people is a symbol of the fact that you’re public and not private sector. Now, you know, I do not at all think that the private sector does it all correctly. But the folks who do it right, and if you were to go to Ogilvy or any of the big public-relations companies and give them this, I think they would laugh at us in the sense that they have been utilizing these insights very aggressively for a very long time. And in the public sector there are some really great examples of having used this before. One example comes from an institution that I used to be part of, Harvard School of Public Health. You know, they very consciously tried to get the notion of a designated driver into sitcoms in Hollywood. And once they got it into sitcoms it became part of the overall mental model that everyone used, and it’s now ubiquitous. And it was the, truly, the genius of a group of just brilliant public health professionals who realized that they had to shift the mental model on driving while drunk. You know, cigarette smoking is another one. And so we’ve done it in bits and pieces. What we’re trying to do now is do it on a much larger scale.

DUBNER: I’m curious, as a trained M.D., whether you see this kind of research is slower to be taken up in the areas where it’s really needed, in development in this case, or faster than in medicine?

KIM: You know, when you look at innovations in medicine, it’s not as if you have a new discovery and then immediately everyone in the United States is implementing it. In fact, the lag time from having a really new discovery of something that’s on the market that’s doable right now to a point when the vast majority of doctors are using them is 17 years. So I’ve, with a bunch of colleagues, and here now at the World Bank, we talk a lot about the science of delivery. In other words, let’s not just focus on the basic research that tells us about the molecular mechanisms or you know, for example, economics that might be fundamental theoretical modeling based on mathematical models. And let’s not focus just on the things that we can prove in scientific studies actually work. Let’s now focus on how you deliver those insights. Let’s focus and be as rigorous as we can be about how you take things to scale. You know, one of my good friends in global health used to say to me, “Jim, I am so sick of pilot project-ology, when can we get on to the field of scale up-ology?” Right? That’s got to be our main focus, because if we’re going to end extreme poverty by 2030, every model we have of growth suggests to us that, that with the pessimistic, with the sort of midway, or the optimistic model of growth, of economic growth, we’re not going to get to less than 3 percent extreme poverty by 2030. So if our job is to fundamentally change the poverty elasticity of growth, we’ve got to be effective, and we’ve got to take effective solutions and scale them and scale them more quickly than we ever have.

[MUSIC: Juan Mejia “La Gua Gua” (from 2012 Productions)]

DUBNER: The World Bank has its fans and its detractors. I have to say, it’s hard to imagine that Jim Yong Kim could have too many detractors – he seems to bring so many talents to the job. He’s smart, plainly, experienced, compassionate, he’s a good executive – don’t forget, he’s an M.D. as well. So I know what you’re thinking: that’s disturbing! Isn’t there anything he’s bad at? Well, I am happy to report, that he is not a very good singer.

KIM: (singing) I had the time of my life and I never felt this way before. And I swear, it’s the truth, and I owe it all to you…

DUBNER: That is from a student talent show at Dartmouth, when Kim was president there. But honestly, even his singing wasn’t that bad. He also danced and rapped.  You know what? He wasn’t that bad at any of those either. So what does the talent show really teach us? It teaches us that Jim Yong King has something that very few others in official Washington have: the ability to not take yourself too seriously. And so, even though he is the President of the World Bank, we asked him to go through a blitz version of our FREAK-quently Asked Questions. He agreed, of course.

DUBNER: Dr. Kim, if you would tell us in 60 seconds or less what you actually do in a given day.

KIM: I spend a lot of time going through my briefing books which look like real books, and I get one every day. I’m in meetings all the time with all kinds of people, and I try to one, keep my mouth shut when me saying something could influence a decision we make, and then make a decision when no one else can make a decision.

DUBNER: What’s the best investment you’ve ever made financial, emotional, educational, any kind of investment in getting to where you are today?

KIM: I think one of them, it’s rather simplistic, but late in my life, when I was 24, I started learning languages. I only really spoke English until I was 24. When I was 24 I learned to speak Korean, because I went back to Korea to do my dissertation research. And so now I speak Korean, which has been great, especially in all of my work with Secretary General Ban Ki Moon of the United Nations. It’s been great to be able to have secret conversations in the middle of chaos. Then later, I learned to speak Spanish. So it really was worthwhile for me to do that. And I just desperately regret not having done more of that when I was younger.

DUBNER: Who’s been the biggest influence on your life and work and why?

KIM: Well, you know, fundamentally it’s been my mother who was a neo-Confucian philosopher. But she’s been so influential because at a very young age, I mean, I was reading the speeches and the writings of Martin Luther King when I was nine years old. So Martin Luther King has certainly been a huge influence. And so people like Martin Luther King, people who have taken an idea fundamentally rooted in moral convictions and then changed the world are the people who inspire me.

DUBNER: Tell us one thing you’ve habitually spent too much on, but do not regret.

KIM: Oh gosh, it’s food. It’s eating, eating at restaurants all over the world. In fact, in fact, I have a rule: When I travel to a developing country, for every meal I want native food as opposed to, you know, thinking that I need French food or, Western food. So I’ve spent a lot of money at a lot of different restaurants. Also with my children, we love to eat.

DUBNER: Do you cook as well?

KIM: Not very well. I used to a lot more, but not much these days.

DUBNER: Tell me one thing you own that you should probably throw out but never will.

KIM: I have a collection of putters, golf putters, that I just can’t seem to throw away. You know, it’s part of golf, you know, golf allows for a lot of magical thinking, and so I remember the magical putts I made with some of these putters. And so I’ve kept them and kept them and kept them despite efforts of everyone around me to throw them out.

DUBNER: The next question was what do you collect and why? Just asked and answered, or answered without being asked. What’s the one story that your family, maybe it’s your kids, maybe it’s your parents, always tells about you?

KIM: Well, my brother likes to tell this story. My brother is a gastroenterologist in Los Angeles. And he always says that if he and I were to come to a wall with three doors, he had would quickly and automatically go through the door that was open, but that I would put my head through the wall just in case that was a better way to approach getting to the other side. So, of course, the story is that I’ve always chosen the most difficult path. But it served me very well.

DUBNER: Interesting. Well that either leads perfectly into or totally obviates my final question, which is I wanted you to tell me about something that you once quit and why and how it worked out. But if you’re willing to put your head through a wall you may never have quit anything at all. Did you?

KIM: I did. I actually quit my infectious disease fellowship. Now, this was in about the 30th consecutive year of being involved in education from the age of five. So it wasn’t as if I gave up prematurely. But I just decided that the credential I would get is to be able to treat people with infectious diseases in hospitals in the United States. And I just realized I’d never do that. And I’ve continued to work on tuberculosis and HIV and now Ebola. But I did quit that.

DUBNER: Dr. Kim, thanks so much, it was a pure pleasure to speak with you, and I learned a lot, and I’m sure everyone listening will as well. And thanks so much for making the time.

KIM: Well, thank you for having me, and thank you for doing this.

[END HEARING KIM RAPPING]

[MUSIC: The Civil Tones, “The Bailiff” (from Rotisserie Twist)]

[CREDITS]

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “Hacking the World Bank

10:49 am est 

Monday, February 16, 2015

notes on accompaniment

Accompaniment is a key to POP for botr Farmer and Gutierrez. In their work - in theology and global health - accompaniment is  a model of how to make solidairt operational.

Basically to accompany someone means to go somewhere, with him or her - to break bread togteher- to be present on a journey. There's an element of mystery, openness and trust in accompaniment. The companion, the accompagnateur says" I will go with you and support you on your journey wherever it leads. I will share your fate for a while. And I dont mean a short while.  Accompaniment is about sticking with a task until it is deemed complete not by the accomopagnateur but by the person being accomopanied.

 

 

1:41 pm est 

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Noble Laureate Muhammad Yunus  and www partners of Grameen youth investment banking launch youtube competition -what would purpose of youth's favorite free online university be?

join blog of moocyunus



help background research - which places have a 12 minute curriculum for millions of youth to share  on increasing good jobs everywhere

4 NATIONS THAT CAN LEAD YOUTH WWW TO SUSTAINABILITY

China 11)

USA (10)

Japan

Brazil 9

EUROZONE IN GREATEST DANGER OF LOST GENERATION

UK8

France

Germany (3.0-5)

Spain

Italy

Netherlands

Belgium

Luxembourg

Switzerland

Norway

sweden

finland

denmark

Russia (2.8-6)

Poland

Czechoslavakia

Greece

turkey

albania

ASIAN SEASONS BEYOND SPRING?

Bangla7

India (4.2-4)

Sri Lanka

Pakistan

Kyrgyzstan

Afghanistan

Nepal

Malaysia

Singapore

Indonesia

Thailand

Myanmar

Philippines

Cambodia

Vietnam

Korea

OAsia

Australia

New Zealand

Canada 10

SOUTH OF THE BORDER 9

Haiti9

Mexico

Chile

Argentina

Paraguay

Uruguay

Bolivia

Peru

Ecuador

Colombia

Venezuela

AFRICA RISING

Morocco1

Senegal2

Cameroon3

SAfrica 5

Ethiopia 4

Kenya4

Algeria1

Tunisia

Libya

Egypt

Mauritania

Benin2

Burkina F

CoteDIvoire

Ghana

Guinea

Togo

Gambia

SierraLeone

Liberia

Mali

Niger

Nigeria

RepCentreA3

Gaboa

Guinea

Congo

RepCongo

Chad

Tanzania 4

Rwanda

Uganda

Sudan

Eritrea

Somalia

Angola5

Zambia

Malawi

Zimbabwe

Mozambique

Madagascar

Namibia

Botswana

ARAB SPRING

SaudiArabia6   Yemen

Jordan

Israel

Palestine

UAE

Dubai

Oman

Lebanon

Syria

Iran

Iraq

Kuwait

Bahrain


help us develop 12 minute curriculum of youth who celebrate yunus type job creation

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9:27 am edt 

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

tales of 2 economics

UP Micro

DOWN Macro

 64trilliondollarquestions5.jpg

Upmicro maps how to design value multiplying exchanges which are 10-win, or when networks connect pairs of systems 100-win. It models expoentials - to hep leder know what future they are spinning up (tensely purposeful but not conflicted) or down (multiplying conflicts with true purspoe). Micro designs are always very simple to map but very contextually detailed. The accounting professionals we are looking to join us need to agree that global accounting has made stupendous 2 errors on goodwill; it adds things up insted of multiplying - eg andersen had billions of business value but destoyed its trusr with society to zero value; consequence it becme worth billions*0=0 not what andersen's managers assumed billions+0=billions; also global accountants still impose an industrial valuation mindset- machines can be booked in as investments whereas people are always costs to cut. When these 2 details are compounded quarter after quarter into one single spredseeted number- people forget wht the number represents. In this way Global accountnts have destroyed at least 100 multibillion corporations in 2000s by rewarding managers to chase numbers that were not the exponential truth. This was foreseen as  crisis in the year 2000 book Unseen Wealth.

How could any common sense person call what wall street macroeconomics did with subprime housing investments "economical". In fact, my dad's last article suggests that it was so costly that unless we learn the right microeconomic lessons we will have chained a generation of US youth to depression and debt. I find the following books extremely scary as they explain how mnay of orwell's big brothers re already chaining us all with macroeconomics (which as early as 1984 dad was writing up at his desk at The Economist as mostly disgraceful political chicanery)

It takes a pillage, Naomi Prins - the story of Goldmn Scahs

Too Big to  Save by Robert Pozen

Crisis by Design by JOhn Wolfe  

Economics for youth & future

Economics for old & past

Economics for the small and growing

Economics for the big and decaying

Economics for compounding zero conflicts : win-win-wins

Economics compounding conflicts so that one most powerful groups extracts from all others every cycle : lose-lose-lose

Economics for investing in life critical needs of babies, families, communities

Economics that cannot see such small systems as children or individuals’ productive learning curves

Economics for discovering the creativity born inside every person and education that empower all people to create jobs

Economics where most people never discover their greatest creative flows and are failed by over-standardised examinations

Economics where media heroises those who achieve the greatest improvements in the human lot

Media that images over reality and which heroises players of spectator sports

 Whole truth celebrting the most purposeful organisations and networks humans can design Inconvenient truth thst traps more and more people in organsations that are not measured in a grounded way to live unique purpose, other than that of rewarding a few speculators at everyone else's increasing cost 
10:26 am edt 

possible microprofessionals - Bill Sorms NY
BIll Sorms is a professional who has come over to the peoples side- well practised in all the derivative maths wall street firms used to hire him for

Risk management needs to be understood in the context of what an organization is trying to achieve rather than what it wants to avoid. This blog explores the difference between risk management and compliance and the principles of managing strategy rather than fear.

Friday, October 15, 2010

The Means of Exchange

The past several weeks have seen new revelations about the complexity of the mortgage industry and the astonishing level of sloppy work done to document that complexity. We are on the verge of massive lawsuits and a good deal of wailing and gnashing of teeth on the part of the banks that issued the loans and the entities that processed, repackaged and sold them as securities. According to William D. Cohan’s piece in the New York Times the banks not only knew about the problem, they hired a company to tell them all about it and then apparently ignored their report.


This is but the latest revelation in the unwinding of our monetary system. It is a symptom of a fundamental underlying problem. Much of the debate has been and is seems will continue to be whether or not we should ignore moral hazard or root out and punish the greedy. Viewed in terms of the current argument, there doesn’t seem to be a solution. People are living in houses that they couldn’t afford and now are worth less than the debt that encumbers them. Banks extended loans with the knowledge they were unlikely to be paid and then failed to comply with the legal requirements which simply mirror the complexity of the securities that were created. A fine mess.

Last night a nameless spokesperson for the Bank of America insisted that even if the bank hadn’t obeyed the law, the underlying facts were accurate. In other words, people had taken out mortgages, weren’t paying and should lose their homes. As the AG’s of forty states join together to halt foreclosures and the debate rages about what should be done we will not doubt hear more of the same. But the laws were written so that the banks could resell, package and securitize the mortgages. Which set of rules should apply? Eventually we will reach a compromise on this issue. People can’t own homes for free and banks can’t decide which part of the law they want to obey. But even as we develop a solution that no one will like we will not have addressed the core issue.

For the last thousand years we have had a debt based monetary system in one form or another. Where money comes from remains a mystery to most people. We teach very little about how our economy works and how we get money into that economic system in our public and private schools – even at the high school level. When people do educate themselves it seems that many of them feel compelled to write about what they have learned in capital letters on the Internet. It’s difficult to have a dispassionate discussion about money when more and more people don’t have any, but we really don’t have much choice in the matter.

It is not new that we have very large issues that we choose not to address. As anyone who has lived through a failed marriage knows, ignoring problems doesn’t make them go away – they simply get bigger. That’s what is happening now. The drive to address the demands of interest on the debt exploits a human trait that we call greed – not the other way around. Those who insist that our solutions lie in the thoughts of the 18th century minds who created the US Constitution, brilliant though they may have been, are missing the point.

Money is a means of exchange. It is developed as cultures become more complex. Accumulating money gives individuals and organizations power, but only up to a point. In the past, disproportionate accumulation has met with societal resistance sometimes manifesting in revolution. An increasingly vocal minority seem to be insisting that we are at this point again. But returning to simpler times is not really a viable solution. We are hopelessly interconnected (or perhaps hopefully) with each other across national borders. We have to begin to discuss and address the issue of money, interest and debt. It could be argued that the current debt-based system has served us well and perhaps, on balance, it has. But nothing is forever and it would be useful if we began to think about whether the level of complexity in our means of exchange can reasonably be expected to serve us in the future.
5:51 am edt 

possible micro100 professionals - rick wartzman

the intent of this knowledge sharing model of Drucker Institute seems interesting though I have not had  a full working through with it in practice; occasionally chat with rick wartzman head of drucker institute (himself the host of  yunus event book 1 in LA)


i wonder if it has analogy for social business toolkit ... perhaps we need to try and engage him further down the road when SB (or microcredit) toolkits are being developed at hubs or through other networks that aim to open source economics for youth


chris

www.valuetrue.com

--- On Tue, 19/10/10, The Drucker Institute <thedx@druckerinstitute.com> wrote:


From: The Drucker Institute <thedx@druckerinstitute.com>
Subject: Announcing: the Drucker Exchange
To: chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk
Date: Tuesday, 19 October, 2010, 22:49

The Drucker Exchange

Dear friend,

What's new?

Today we introduce our new blog, the Drucker Exchange, about bettering society through effective management and responsible leadership.

The Drucker Exchange (the Dx) replaces our old platform, Drucker Apps. In its new format, the Dx will feature shorter and more frequent postings covering a wider variety of topics—though each will still be viewed through the work of Peter Drucker, the father of modern management.

Why?

Phalana Tiller, the Drucker Institute’s communications manager, noted that Drucker Apps has been very popular, with more than 36,000 hits over the last six months. But the bulk of reader engagement has come whenever a new topic has been posted. Interest has trailed off on subsequent days, even though the Institute has been adding interviews with outside experts and other resources on the subject at hand.

“As we’ve measured our results -- just as Drucker would have insisted we do -- it’s become clear that in social media, a conversation that’s tied to what’s happening in the news needs to move faster,” Tiller said. “We can’t stay on a single subject for as long as we have.”

What else?

We are still intent on maintaining the depth of information that comes from interviews with scholars and executives who are wrestling with the kinds of big issues that Peter Drucker addressed. With that in mind, we are now developing a radio show that will lend itself more naturally to a longer interview format.

“We’re excited about both the Drucker Exchange and the promise of a new radio show,” said Rick Wartzman, executive director of the Drucker Institute. “Being on the radio can help us broaden our audience and reach tens of thousands more people who understand that responsible management is the key to a healthy society. So stay tuned for details on that.”

You can reach the Drucker Exchange —and participate in the dialogue there—by visiting thedx.org or by going through the Drucker Institute’s website at druckerinstitute.com. (Those who’ve bookmarked apps.druckerinstitute.com will automatically be taken to the Drucker Exchange.)

5:37 am edt 

Sunday, October 25, 2009

sb31.jpg

Rule 1 of 3 of Bangladeshi Social Business - the model that proven over 33 years to resolve sustainability crisises and end poverty is very simple. Namely: the ownership of the system should be by or in trust of those whom have the deepest need of the system's unique purpose.

This rule has been broken so often in the case of microfinance that Muhammad Yunus wrote his end of 2007 book on "creating a world without poverty - the social business model" explicitly to ensure no ambiguity among any who claim to be practitioners of Bangladeshi microcredit or micro anything. His chapter 1 explains very clearly that the West has not been making significant inroads into ending the most extreme poverty because there is literally no organisational system typology designed wholly to this purpose. Putting ownership communally into the poorest customers hands - as Grameen did at time of constitution by Bangladeshi law in 1983 - is in effect what makes social business models capable of generating sustainability world's greatest inventions,  -achieving the most heroic goals of any systems designed by humans.   
6:58 pm edt 

sb32.jpg
This is Rule 2 of 3 of social business - the only proven system design to sustain communities and the world

before mapping segmentations transparency integrates as many as 10 sources of flow into a productive and demanding value exchange - some may be implicit - for example even if a country's government has no laws pricing unsustainable use of a local resource, that would impoverish the local society over time so social business models as defined since the 1970s in Bangladesh must not cut sustainability corners of an ecological kind;

I have never seen a transparent exchange where one or more parties are only there to take out money as fast as possible; in fact such speculators pose the most conflict to long-term investment ownership in ordinary busienss models- in the social business model where the owner and the customer/society in deepest need of the organisational purpose are coincident, it clearly would destroy communal transparency and purpose if any participant was only there for the money


10win0.jpg
6:34 pm edt 

sb33.jpg

Rule 3 of 3 of social business - the only proven system design to sustain communities and the world - is: design an organisational system to cycle positive cashflow in robustly mapped way -where the model has proven its sustainability in terms of mulltiplying the trust of every participant so that it makes more than it costs - then always reinvest all of the surplus in the system's purpose 

This rule enables social business to compound extraordinary goals over time ; as a family of journalists with over 60 years of cataloguing entrepreneur cases, we do not accept that the word entrepreneur was coined to apply to someone who doesn't have system design understanding of the cost model and/or hasn't had the creativity and determination to demonstrate where the model is going to gain more cash incoming each cycle than outgoing. Unlike charity models which often have to put their most experienced people on eternal fundraising, a well designed social business model frees up the most experienced people to improve its purpose or replicate is reach

By putting its profit back in its communal purpose a social business mdoel never runs the risk that it will be used to extract out of the community the productivity or othyer energies that were communaly input. Ruke 3 ensures empowerment not piwering over, it integrates localities sustainably int a global rather than some group playing at global colonialists 

6:12 pm edt 

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Sep 27 2009

Bangladesh Bank Governor Dr Atiur Rahman has gone few steps forward on his endeavour to make banking sector more pro-poor as he highly criticised the country's banks and financial institutions for their lukewarm approach to the poorer section of the society.


The governor in his keynote speech at a seminar, held in the Kenya's capital Nairobi last week, shared his views on the 'banking for poor issue' with a distinguished global audience when he admitted that his own country was lagging behind in providing poorer people with basic banking and financial services.

Dr Atiur, chief of the country's banking and financial sector's watchdog, said the banks and other financial institutions in Bangladesh had been depriving poor people of basic financial services, keeping them trapped in a poverty cycle.

"Despite substantial bank branch expansion and emergence of micro-finance institutions, scant access to basic financial services still remains a deprivation suffered by large segments of the poorer rural and urban population in Bangladesh, more hurtful than other deprivations in restricting opportunities of freeing themselves from the poverty trap", he observed.

He found that the expansion of rural branches of banks and promotion of co-operative societies benefited only the better off rural elite, when the broad masses of illiterate, innumerate rural poor remained out of financial services.

"The co-operatives tended to fall prey to 'elite capture' by powerful local groups uninterested in diluting control by enrolling poorer masses in large numbers. Rural branches of banks focused mainly on crop loans to farmers, their lending models were not geared towards reaching out to the poorer landless illiterate unable to handle the paperwork involved in bank borrowing," said Dr Atiur.

The governor, however, cited the Grameen Bank's micro-finance as a tool in extending credit services to the rural poor, but he said the financial coverage was still incomplete, with gaps both at the lowest end and at some patches up the income ladder.

Dr Atiur, who has already initiated a vigorous approach to make banking services available to the deprived people, said financial inclusion of the important segment of the society would result in more equitable economic growth.

The central bank, under his leadership, has already allocated Taka 11,500 crore for farm sector and another Taka 500 crore for the sharecroppers, who had never been offered such financial facility from the traditional banking sector.

The disbursement of the huge soft loan to sharecroppers will begin next month, bringing in a large number of people under the necessary banking services for the first time in the country's history.

Thousands of farmers will also start getting easy loan in October from the country's highest ever allocation of Taka 11,500 crore to revamp agri- sector aimed at achieving food security.

But still, Dr Atiur feels the necessity for certain rules and regulations for ensuring banking services to the poor people, who in fact, represent the majority of the population.

Dr Atiur apparently advocated precise policy measures to ensure poor people's access to the basic financial services. He referred to the existing rules and regulations in the United States and the United Kingdom to strengthen his gesture.

"Basic financial services including deposit, payments and credit services are recognised as entitlements of all citizens; particularly in advanced economies [US has a federal law prohibiting discrimination by banks against lower income neighbourhoods, and some state laws requiring banks to offer basic accounts for low cost banking services, UK have government programmes promoting financial inclusion], the governor noted.

Article cited from: http://nation.ittefaq.com/issues/2009/09/20/news0805.htm

http://www.muhammadyunus.org/In-the-Media/poor-people-deprived-of-banking-servicesatiur/

Sep 27 2009

Bangladesh Bank Governor Dr Atiur Rahman has gone few steps forward on his endeavour to make banking sector more pro-poor as he highly criticised the country's banks and financial institutions for their lukewarm approach to the poorer section of the society.


The governor in his keynote speech at a seminar, held in the Kenya's capital Nairobi last week, shared his views on the 'banking for poor issue' with a distinguished global audience when he admitted that his own country was lagging behind in providing poorer people with basic banking and financial services.

Dr Atiur, chief of the country's banking and financial sector's watchdog, said the banks and other financial institutions in Bangladesh had been depriving poor people of basic financial services, keeping them trapped in a poverty cycle.

"Despite substantial bank branch expansion and emergence of micro-finance institutions, scant access to basic financial services still remains a deprivation suffered by large segments of the poorer rural and urban population in Bangladesh, more hurtful than other deprivations in restricting opportunities of freeing themselves from the poverty trap", he observed.

He found that the expansion of rural branches of banks and promotion of co-operative societies benefited only the better off rural elite, when the broad masses of illiterate, innumerate rural poor remained out of financial services.

"The co-operatives tended to fall prey to 'elite capture' by powerful local groups uninterested in diluting control by enrolling poorer masses in large numbers. Rural branches of banks focused mainly on crop loans to farmers, their lending models were not geared towards reaching out to the poorer landless illiterate unable to handle the paperwork involved in bank borrowing," said Dr Atiur.

The governor, however, cited the Grameen Bank's micro-finance as a tool in extending credit services to the rural poor, but he said the financial coverage was still incomplete, with gaps both at the lowest end and at some patches up the income ladder.

Dr Atiur, who has already initiated a vigorous approach to make banking services available to the deprived people, said financial inclusion of the important segment of the society would result in more equitable economic growth.

The central bank, under his leadership, has already allocated Taka 11,500 crore for farm sector and another Taka 500 crore for the sharecroppers, who had never been offered such financial facility from the traditional banking sector.

The disbursement of the huge soft loan to sharecroppers will begin next month, bringing in a large number of people under the necessary banking services for the first time in the country's history.

Thousands of farmers will also start getting easy loan in October from the country's highest ever allocation of Taka 11,500 crore to revamp agri- sector aimed at achieving food security.

But still, Dr Atiur feels the necessity for certain rules and regulations for ensuring banking services to the poor people, who in fact, represent the majority of the population.

Dr Atiur apparently advocated precise policy measures to ensure poor people's access to the basic financial services. He referred to the existing rules and regulations in the United States and the United Kingdom to strengthen his gesture.

"Basic financial services including deposit, payments and credit services are recognised as entitlements of all citizens; particularly in advanced economies [US has a federal law prohibiting discrimination by banks against lower income neighbourhoods, and some state laws requiring banks to offer basic accounts for low cost banking services, UK have government programmes promoting financial inclusion], the governor noted.

Article cited from: http://nation.ittefaq.com/issues/2009/09/20/news0805.htm

Sep 27 2009

Bangladesh Bank Governor Dr Atiur Rahman has gone few steps forward on his endeavour to make banking sector more pro-poor as he highly criticised the country's banks and financial institutions for their lukewarm approach to the poorer section of the society.


The governor in his keynote speech at a seminar, held in the Kenya's capital Nairobi last week, shared his views on the 'banking for poor issue' with a distinguished global audience when he admitted that his own country was lagging behind in providing poorer people with basic banking and financial services.

Dr Atiur, chief of the country's banking and financial sector's watchdog, said the banks and other financial institutions in Bangladesh had been depriving poor people of basic financial services, keeping them trapped in a poverty cycle.

"Despite substantial bank branch expansion and emergence of micro-finance institutions, scant access to basic financial services still remains a deprivation suffered by large segments of the poorer rural and urban population in Bangladesh, more hurtful than other deprivations in restricting opportunities of freeing themselves from the poverty trap", he observed.

He found that the expansion of rural branches of banks and promotion of co-operative societies benefited only the better off rural elite, when the broad masses of illiterate, innumerate rural poor remained out of financial services.

"The co-operatives tended to fall prey to 'elite capture' by powerful local groups uninterested in diluting control by enrolling poorer masses in large numbers. Rural branches of banks focused mainly on crop loans to farmers, their lending models were not geared towards reaching out to the poorer landless illiterate unable to handle the paperwork involved in bank borrowing," said Dr Atiur.

The governor, however, cited the Grameen Bank's micro-finance as a tool in extending credit services to the rural poor, but he said the financial coverage was still incomplete, with gaps both at the lowest end and at some patches up the income ladder.

Dr Atiur, who has already initiated a vigorous approach to make banking services available to the deprived people, said financial inclusion of the important segment of the society would result in more equitable economic growth.

The central bank, under his leadership, has already allocated Taka 11,500 crore for farm sector and another Taka 500 crore for the sharecroppers, who had never been offered such financial facility from the traditional banking sector.

The disbursement of the huge soft loan to sharecroppers will begin next month, bringing in a large number of people under the necessary banking services for the first time in the country's history.

Thousands of farmers will also start getting easy loan in October from the country's highest ever allocation of Taka 11,500 crore to revamp agri- sector aimed at achieving food security.

But still, Dr Atiur feels the necessity for certain rules and regulations for ensuring banking services to the poor people, who in fact, represent the majority of the population.

Dr Atiur apparently advocated precise policy measures to ensure poor people's access to the basic financial services. He referred to the existing rules and regulations in the United States and the United Kingdom to strengthen his gesture.

"Basic financial services including deposit, payments and credit services are recognised as entitlements of all citizens; particularly in advanced economies [US has a federal law prohibiting discrimination by banks against lower income neighbourhoods, and some state laws requiring banks to offer basic accounts for low cost banking services, UK have government programmes promoting financial inclusion], the governor noted.

Article cited from: http://nation.ittefaq.com/issues/2009/09/20/news0805.htm

Sep 27 2009

Bangladesh Bank Governor Dr Atiur Rahman has gone few steps forward on his endeavour to make banking sector more pro-poor as he highly criticised the country's banks and financial institutions for their lukewarm approach to the poorer section of the society.


The governor in his keynote speech at a seminar, held in the Kenya's capital Nairobi last week, shared his views on the 'banking for poor issue' with a distinguished global audience when he admitted that his own country was lagging behind in providing poorer people with basic banking and financial services.

Dr Atiur, chief of the country's banking and financial sector's watchdog, said the banks and other financial institutions in Bangladesh had been depriving poor people of basic financial services, keeping them trapped in a poverty cycle.

"Despite substantial bank branch expansion and emergence of micro-finance institutions, scant access to basic financial services still remains a deprivation suffered by large segments of the poorer rural and urban population in Bangladesh, more hurtful than other deprivations in restricting opportunities of freeing themselves from the poverty trap", he observed.

He found that the expansion of rural branches of banks and promotion of co-operative societies benefited only the better off rural elite, when the broad masses of illiterate, innumerate rural poor remained out of financial services.

"The co-operatives tended to fall prey to 'elite capture' by powerful local groups uninterested in diluting control by enrolling poorer masses in large numbers. Rural branches of banks focused mainly on crop loans to farmers, their lending models were not geared towards reaching out to the poorer landless illiterate unable to handle the paperwork involved in bank borrowing," said Dr Atiur.

The governor, however, cited the Grameen Bank's micro-finance as a tool in extending credit services to the rural poor, but he said the financial coverage was still incomplete, with gaps both at the lowest end and at some patches up the income ladder.

Dr Atiur, who has already initiated a vigorous approach to make banking services available to the deprived people, said financial inclusion of the important segment of the society would result in more equitable economic growth.

The central bank, under his leadership, has already allocated Taka 11,500 crore for farm sector and another Taka 500 crore for the sharecroppers, who had never been offered such financial facility from the traditional banking sector.

The disbursement of the huge soft loan to sharecroppers will begin next month, bringing in a large number of people under the necessary banking services for the first time in the country's history.

Thousands of farmers will also start getting easy loan in October from the country's highest ever allocation of Taka 11,500 crore to revamp agri- sector aimed at achieving food security.

But still, Dr Atiur feels the necessity for certain rules and regulations for ensuring banking services to the poor people, who in fact, represent the majority of the population.

Dr Atiur apparently advocated precise policy measures to ensure poor people's access to the basic financial services. He referred to the existing rules and regulations in the United States and the United Kingdom to strengthen his gesture.

"Basic financial services including deposit, payments and credit services are recognised as entitlements of all citizens; particularly in advanced economies [US has a federal law prohibiting discrimination by banks against lower income neighbourhoods, and some state laws requiring banks to offer basic accounts for low cost banking services, UK have government programmes promoting financial inclusion], the governor noted.

Article cited from: http://nation.ittefaq.com/issues/2009/09/20/news0805.htm

Bangladesh Bank Governor Dr Atiur Rahman has gone few steps forward on his endeavour to make banking sector more pro-poor as he highly criticised the country's banks and financial institutions for their lukewarm approach to the poorer section of the society.
The governor in his keynote speech at a seminar, held in the Kenya's capital Nairobi last week, shared his views on the 'banking for poor issue' with a distinguished global audience when he admitted that his own country was lagging behind in providing poorer people with basic banking and financial services.

Dr Atiur, chief of the country's banking and financial sector's watchdog, said the banks and other financial institutions in Bangladesh had been depriving poor people of basic financial services, keeping them trapped in a poverty cycle.

"Despite substantial bank branch expansion and emergence of micro-finance institutions, scant access to basic financial services still remains a deprivation suffered by large segments of the poorer rural and urban population in Bangladesh, more hurtful than other deprivations in restricting opportunities of freeing themselves from the poverty trap", he observed.

He found that the expansion of rural branches of banks and promotion of co-operative societies benefited only the better off rural elite, when the broad masses of illiterate, innumerate rural poor remained out of financial services.

"The co-operatives tended to fall prey to 'elite capture' by powerful local groups uninterested in diluting control by enrolling poorer masses in large numbers. Rural branches of banks focused mainly on crop loans to farmers, their lending models were not geared towards reaching out to the poorer landless illiterate unable to handle the paperwork involved in bank borrowing," said Dr Atiur.

The governor, however, cited the Grameen Bank's micro-finance as a tool in extending credit services to the rural poor, but he said the financial coverage was still incomplete, with gaps both at the lowest end and at some patches up the income ladder.

Dr Atiur, who has already initiated a vigorous approach to make banking services available to the deprived people, said financial inclusion of the important segment of the society would result in more equitable economic growth.

The central bank, under his leadership, has already allocated Taka 11,500 crore for farm sector and another Taka 500 crore for the sharecroppers, who had never been offered such financial facility from the traditional banking sector.

The disbursement of the huge soft loan to sharecroppers will begin next month, bringing in a large number of people under the necessary banking services for the first time in the country's history.

Thousands of farmers will also start getting easy loan in October from the country's highest ever allocation of Taka 11,500 crore to revamp agri- sector aimed at achieving food security.

But still, Dr Atiur feels the necessity for certain rules and regulations for ensuring banking services to the poor people, who in fact, represent the majority of the population.

Dr Atiur apparently advocated precise policy measures to ensure poor people's access to the basic financial services. He referred to the existing rules and regulations in the United States and the United Kingdom to strengthen his gesture.

"Basic financial services including deposit, payments and credit services are recognised as entitlements of all citizens; particularly in advanced economies [US has a federal law prohibiting discrimination by banks against lower income neighbourhoods, and some state laws requiring banks to offer basic accounts for low cost banking services, UK have government programmes promoting financial inclusion], the governor noted.
Article cited from: http://nation.ittefaq.com/issues/2009/09/20/news0805.htm
8:57 am edt 

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Dear Zasheem (Grameen Glasgow)


I know that on Yunus British Council day in London in July you introduced Dr Yunus to part of the homeless world cup team


Here are various snippets of news about fifa etc I have heard; dont know if they connect but thought it was worth logging them in one place


1 FIFA commitments announced last week

Football for Hope - 20 Centres for 2010 in Africa (note in margin-can kenya opening be celebrated at microcreditsummit 2010)  
Commitment by: Fédération Internationale de Football Association
Focus Area: Education

Introduction: Over the next five years, and as part of the Official Campaign and social legacy of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, FIFA is committing $9 million to create 20 community centers throughout Africa (the Football for Hope Centres). These centres will address social challenges the communities face, including providing public health and education facilities and football-based development programmes.

streetfootballworld
Architecture for Humanity
Greenfields
Grassroot Soccer South Africa
Mathare Youth Sports Association Kenya
Special Olymipics Namibia
Association Malienne pour la Jeune Femme et la Femme
Esperance Rwanda
Play Soccer Ghana
Football for Hope
Adidas AG
Emirates
Hyundai Motor Company
Sony Corporation
Visa Inc.
Comic Relief
Jacob's Foundation
SolarWorld
Swiss Academy for Development
Architecture for Humanity

Read More

2 FIFA with visa commit to teach 20 million financial literacy with new web based game financial football http://www.financialfootball.com/


=====

Saskia and Hans of grameen creative lab http://www.grameencl.com  told sofia http://londoncreativelabs.com  and me when we visited them in wiesbaden that dr yunus made a video to fifa in july while giving the mandela birthday lecture asking that s.africa world cup 2010 co-celebrated african's race to end poverty. Moreover Adidas is one of the GlobalGrameen celebration partners in berlin in November and are


It is my understanding that asking global brand ceos to get sports organisers like fifa and olympics to celebrate 2010s joy of life & millennium goals decade will be part of dr yunus continuous summits with global brand ceos starting in berlin in november. The London Olympics having already promised to be the sustainability olympics is something that I expect UK sustainability and yunus fans eg sofia and paul rose www.paulrose.org  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8130130.stm to be connecting ideas round. In fact since 2004 some of my friends have been building momentim towards demanding the bbc give equal share of voice to sustainability issues as it does to sports or expect a licence fee revolt. Of course there are many ways to try and econourage the positive side by 2012, but the BBC has been appalingly late to question system collapsing issues from the people's side in the way that the world's largest social business broadcaster ought to do. 


It is also notable that Grameen Danone's superstar ambassador is french footballer Zidane -if my french is correct zidane is also convening an under 12 year olds world cup in s.africa next year http://www.lhebdojournal.com/article-377911-Un-6e-camp-Danone-au-Stade-de-lUQTR.html

5:49 pm edt 

2017.01.01 | 2015.02.01 | 2013.04.01 | 2010.10.01 | 2009.10.01 | 2009.09.01

Link to web log's RSS file

stiglitz on stupid political economics

pope on european union ruling over economies that only care about haggard infertile grandmothers 

hazle henderson on freeing ethical markets 

global banking rules are mad out of basle - see swissleaks 

why did obama fine instead of close down frauds at rating agencies and big banks 

inet on currencies other than those supported by bankers bubbling property 

Nomi Prins -and the wors bank of all was ??? 

 

Typical story - rolling stone

 Fleischmann is the central witness in one of the biggest cases of white-collar crime in American history, possessing secrets that JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon late last year paid $9 billion (not $13 billion as regularly reported – more on that later) to keep the public from hearing.

Back in 2006, as a deal manager at the gigantic bank, Fleischmann first witnessed, then tried to stop, what she describes as "massive criminal securities fraud" in the bank's mortgage operations.

Thanks to a confidentiality agreement, she's kept her mouth shut since then. "My closest family and friends don't know what I've been living with," she says. "Even my brother will only find out for the first time when he sees this interview." 

Six years after the crisis that cratered the global economy, it's not exactly news that the country's biggest banks stole on a grand scale. That's why the more important part of Fleischmann's story is in the pains Chase and the Justice Department took to silence her.

She was blocked at every turn: by asleep-on-the-job regulators like the Securities and Exchange Commission, by a court system that allowed Chase to use its billions to bury her evidence, and, finally, by officials like outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder, the chief architect of the crazily elaborate government policy of surrender, secrecy and cover-up. "Every time I had a chance to talk, something always got in the way," Fleischmann says.

This past year she watched as Holder's Justice Department struck a series of historic settlement deals with Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America. The root bargain in these deals was cash for secrecy. The banks paid big fines, without trials or even judges – only secret negotiations that typically ended with the public shown nothing but vague, quasi-official papers called "statements of facts," which were conveniently devoid of anything like actual facts. 

Jamie DimonJamie Dimon Bloomberg/Getty

And now, with Holder about to leave office and his Justice Department reportedly wrapping up its final settlements, the state is effectively putting the finishing touches on what will amount to a sweeping, industrywide effort to bury the facts of a whole generation of Wall Street corruption



Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-9-billion-witness-20141106#ixzz3T9eJKxM7 
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